Courses in Tier 1 offer opportunities to learn more about universal core instruction and curriculum as well as school-wide use of data to make decisions. Core means what we do for all students in academics (such as literacy and math), social-emotional learning, and behavior. Tier 1 learning opportunities also include courses in supporting diverse learners such as those with disabilities and multi-lingual learners in the Tier 1 classroom, as well as courses on using school-wide data to guide problem solving and decision making.

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The AntiRacist Challenge from the AntiRacist Table

The AntiRacist Table was created in response to the Racial Reckoning in America, as a way to bring AntiRacism into daily life as a daily practice starting with the 30 Day AntiRacist Challenge!  Ultimately, the choice is up to you – What awaits you is allyship, abolitionism, co-conspiratorship, and the dismantling of racism in yourself, your family, your community, your school, and your workplace.  

Welcome to our table. Changemakers and forces for good unite!

Through participation in this Community of Practice, you will:
  • cultivate mindfulness and daily practices centered around equality, justice, and humanity 
  • integrate the AntiRacist Table Core Principles into your life to face and get past fear, anger, and blame and to develop empathy
  • aspire to be an AntiRacist - a lifelong pursuit that starts and ends with you, requiring intentional daily practice 

BRIDGE-RI is piloting the AntiRacist Challenge with a small group of participants in January and February 2021. Enrollment is currently closed, but please check back for upcoming opportunities to join the Challenge. Subscribe to our mailing list or follow us on social media for the next opening.


Intended Audiences

All Educators and Leaders

Course Type

Community of Practice

Recommended # of PLUs

30 PLUs


Facilitator: Nicole Bucka

Classroom Management

This short, self-paced course will give you evidence-based strategies and practices for effective classroom management. Topics covered will include:
  • the importance of classroom management
  • what effective classroom management looks and sounds like in action
  • a validated tool to assess your own classroom management
  • evidence-based strategies and resources for addressing different aspects of classroom management
  • action planning for improved classroom management

Please note this course was developed for traditional in-person classroom learning environments, and to that end, no strategies or practices are specific to the virtual environment. However, we encourage participants to consider the virtual learning version of the strategies and resources throughout the course as we add distance learning content. 
To successfully earn a course completion certificate and any corresponding PLUs, you must complete a self-assessment on your own classroom management, pick at least one area of improvement, and formulate an action plan to improve an aspect of your classroom management. To this end, you will need to stop throughout specific points in this course, complete a task, and then come back to the course when the task has been completed.


Intended Audiences

K-12 Educators

Course Type

Self-Paced

Recommended # of PLUs

2 PLUs


Course Support Contact: Ellen Reinhardt, Lindsay Scarpaci

Implementing an SEL Screener: Measuring Connections within a COVID Context

In this facilitated course, with Community of Practice (COP), participants will learn about a Rhode Island established Connections screener, the administration process, and how data from that screener has been traditionally utilized. Participants will then work to develop and pilot the administration of a screening process within each participant’s COVID/post-COVID school context. The course will have required synchronous meetings (along with optional additional meeting opportunities), self-paced course completion activities aligned with evolving research and resources on connectedness as a result of redesigned educational experiences due to COVID, and creation of action steps for a screening process within each participant’s school setting.
This course is designed to provide consultation, support, and assistance to individuals and/or school teams as they plan and consider the implementation of a Connections screening process. The course will be open for enrollment on September 22, 2020 and run through (approximately) April 2021, with periodic required and optional check-ins with the course facilitator and collaborative opportunities with other participants. Enrollment closes December 6th, 2020. If you have any questions, please contact either Kim Pristawa, kpristawa@gmail.com, or Michele Walden-Doppke, mwalden-doppke@westbaycollaborative.org.

Requirements: 

  • There will be 5 required hour long meetings which will be conducted after school hours (likely meeting time of 3:15pm-4:15pm). These may be adjusted based on participant feedback and there may be additional times available for these required meetings.

  • You must either develop an action plan for how a Connections screening can or will take place in your building or implement a Connections screener in your building. This may be with a small group, classroom, grade-level or greater and may involve others in your building.

Prerequisite: All participants must have taken the one hour self-paced course “The Importance of Connectedness” prior to the enrolling in this course. You can find that course under the home page tab Online Learning > Enroll in a course > Tier 1. At the end of that course, after completing all required activities, an enrollment key for this course will be provided. If you have already taken that course or have difficulty obtaining an enrollment key, contact Michele Walden-Doppke for further assistance. 


Intended Audiences

Administrators, Grade 6-12 Educators, Related Service Providers, MTSS Teams/Members 

Course Type

Facilitated with a Community of Practice

Recommended # of PLUs

15-20 PLUs for full course completion


Course Designer: Michele Walden-Doppke

The Importance of Connectedness

How well do you know the importance of connections in school within the universal/core/Tier 1 setting for students and staff? Can you recognize how connectedness relates to different forms of prevention in schools as well as social-emotional learning? Are you interested in learning about a social-emotional screener that can be used for assessing connections in school?  This course is designed to build knowledge about the importance of connections, consider how it is addressed in your school and provide resources. For those who would like to learn more about the Connections Survey and its administration, this course is a prerequisite and required learning for anyone who is interested in the second course in this series, which will run as a facilitated course from late September 2020 until March 2021.  

Learning Objectives: 

  • Understand the significance of school connectedness
  • Recognize the relationship between mental health/suicide prevention and perceived school connections 
  • Recognize the role that school connectedness plays in social-emotional learning
  • Learn about the relationship between connectedness and school culture/school safety
  • Consider the possibility of measuring connections in your school as a form of social-emotional screening
  • Assess the readiness of your school for implementation of a connections screener.



Intended Audiences

Middle and high school- and district-based educators, interventionists, support staff, and administrators

Course Type

Self-paced

PLUs

1 PLU


Introduction to Reading Foundational Skills

This self-paced course is a prerequisite introduction for a pathway of courses on Reading: Foundational Skills. Through this pathway, participants will develop an understanding of the foundational reading skills in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), how these standards connect to the Science of Reading, and what instruction of each the following foundational skills should entail: print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, and fluency. 

Learning objectives include:

  • Become familiar with reading research (the Science of Reading)

  • Clarify common misconceptions around Foundational Skills within the Common Core State Standards

  • Analyze the Common Core State Standards Foundational Skill progression to illustrate its connection with the Science of Reading in order to move into a deeper exploration of each component (i.e., print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, and fluency) in future pathway courses


Intended Audiences

K-5 Educators, Related Service Providers, Administrators, Coaches, Paraprofessionals

Course Type

Self-Paced

Recommended # of PLUs

2 PLUs







Reading Foundational Skills: Print Concepts

This self-paced course is one of the courses in the Reading: Foundational Skills pathway. Through this pathway, participants will develop an understanding of the foundational reading skills in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), how these standards connect to the Science of Reading, and what instruction of each the following foundational skills should entail: print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, and fluency. This course will dive deeper into Print Concepts. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding how Print Concepts relates to a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) and the Science of Reading (SoR)
  • Clarify what to teach to address print concepts and how to teach these skills 
  • Clarify how to assess if students have the skills of Print Concepts

Please note that Introduction to Reading: Foundational Skills is a prerequisite for enrolling in this course.


Intended Audiences

K-5 Educators, Related Service Providers, Administrators, Coaches, Paraprofessionals

Course Type

Self-Paced

Recommended # of PLUs

2 PLUs







Managing Escalations

This short, self-paced course will give learners evidence-based strategies and steps to preventing and managing student behavioral escalations. Topics covered will include:
  • how managing behavioral escalations is part of the MTSS framework
  • the escalation cycle and how to manage escalations, and
  • the role of the adult in the escalation cycle. 


Intended Audiences

K-12 Educators

Course Type

Self-Paced

Recommended # of PLUs

1 PLU


Course Support Contact: Ellen Reinhardt, Lindsay Scarpaci

Multi-Tiered System of Supports Overview

Participating in any course on BRIDGE-RI, the home of MTSS RI, presumes a foundational understanding of multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS); therefore, it is recommended that all participants begin with this course as a prerequisite to establish common language and conceptual understanding of the framework.

At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the preventative ‘why’ behind an MTSS approach to school improvement

  • Define MTSS and its components

  • Understand how a data-based, problem solving culture is integral to the framework

  • Reflect on how building a tiered model should be informed by Implementation Science


Intended Audiences

K-12 Educators, Administrators, Related Service Providers, Interventionists/Specialists, Paraprofessionals, Coaches

Course Type

Self-paced

Recommended # of PLUs

2 PLUs


Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Writing- Overview

Are you interested in learning more about an evidence-based way to improve your students' writing? This course on Self-Regulated Strategies Development (SRSD) for writing will introduce participants to this highly effective, evidence-based approach for teaching writing.  A brief overview of the SRSD process will be provided alongside first hand data and reports from local educators explaining both its effectiveness and ease of implementation.  While this is a stand-alone course, it also serves as a prerequisite to a live, virtual follow-up training on October 19 and November 16, 2020 to learn how to implement SRSD.


Intended Audiences

Teachers, Literacy Coaches, Building Administrators

Course Type

Self-paced

Recommended # of PLUs

1 PLU


Course Contact: Ellen Reinhardt

Understanding Trauma

Many school-age children have been exposed to adverse childhood experiences – violence, abuse, neglect, and more.  The result can be psychological trauma, which can affect learning and behavior.  This course lays essential foundational knowledge to prepare educators for future coursework addressing trauma-informed supports for students.  Participants in this course will be able to:

  • Describe the prevalence, characteristics and impact of trauma on children

  • Recognize behavior for signs of toxic stress response

  • Explain inter-relationships between adversity, toxic stress, trauma and illness

  • Explain the current science on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) 


Intended Audiences

K-12 Educators, Building Administrators

Course Type

Self-Paced

Recommended # of PLUs

1 PLU







Course Contact: Ellen Reinhardt